Rss

Archives for : Press Releases

The 2nd Annual Mulch Magic Giveaway!

Contact:

Susan Holt
(530) 271-6735

The 2nd Annual Mulch Magic Giveaway!

Grass Valley – NID and the Nevada County Resource Conservation District (NCRCD) are highlighting the multiple benefits of using mulch for gardening and landscaping with the 2nd Annual Mulch Magic Giveaway. This event will provide approximately 160 cubic yards of shredded redwood bark to community residents, and is part of NID’s continuing efforts to promote conscientious water use and conservation in our region.

The Mulch Magic Giveaway begins today, April 26, 2017, and will continue through June 30, 2017, or while supplies last. The community is invited to participate and may now begin picking up vouchers from the NID Business Office, located at 1036 West Main Street in Grass Valley, or the NCRCD office, located at 113 Presley Way, Suite 1 in Grass Valley. Each voucher entitles the holder to ½ cubic yard of mulch per residence, and is redeemable at Rare Earth Landscaping in Grass Valley, or Four Seasons Landscaping in Penn Valley. The mulch is provided in bulk and will require a truck for pickup.

Some of the benefits of using mulch include:

  • Sixty gallons of water saved per week, by adding 2 to 3 inches of mulch around trees and plants for each 1,000 square feet of irrigated landscape.
  • Mulch keeps soil moist and slows evaporation, allowing water to sink into the soil, which reduces the rate of watering needed for plants to thrive.
  • Mulch breaks down into the soil, providing nutrients for trees and plants.
  • Mulch protects plants by moderating soil temperature and suppressing weeds.

For more information on the Mulch Magic Giveaway, or on the benefits of using mulch, please contact: Kaycee Strong at 530-273-6185, ext. 244.

NID is Green for Earth Day

Contact:
Susan Holt
(530) 271-6735

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

NID is Green for Earth Day

Grass Valley – NID extends a “Happy Earth Day 2017” to our customers and the entire community. The first Earth Day was created by Senator Gaylord Nelson in 1970, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates 22 million Americans celebrated clean air, land, and water on that day. The District is proud to continuously provide good stewardship of the watershed in our care in a variety of ways to benefit our community year-round. The following demonstrates some of the exceptional programs provided by NID.

• Hydroelectric: NID strongly supports clean, carbon-free energy. Hydropower is fueled by water, and is a sustainable energy source that can generate power to the grid immediately. In 2016, the seven hydroelectric power plants owned and operated by NID generated over 350,000 megawatt hours of energy for local consumption. Running at full load, NID can provide enough clean energy to serve between 61,000 and 82,000 homes, depending on usage. NID’s hydroelectric power reduces dependence on non-renewable energy sources and helps protect the environment.

• State Water Policy: NID is tracking state water policy and participating in discussions with Association of California Water Agencies (ACWA) and other state and local agencies and regulatory bodies to ensure a regional perspective in water-supply policymaking decisions affecting our area.

• Hemphill Diversion: The District is working with the California Department of Fish & Wildlife (CDFW) to improve fish passage on Auburn Ravine.

• English Meadows Restoration: NID is collaborating with the US Forest Service, California State University’s Geology Department, and Plumas Corporation to create baseline data and map the English Meadows located above Jackson Meadows along the Middle Yuba River. This project will monitor groundwater levels and develop a conceptual project for improving the hydrologic functionality of this system.

• Aquatic Invasive Species: NID is actively working with the Department of Boating and Waterways and the CDFW to develop an Aquatic Invasive Species Program to inform boaters about risks and exposure routes for invasive Quagga and Zebra Mussels.

• Cosumnes, American, Bear and Yuba (CABY) Integrated Regional Water Management Plan (IRWMP): NID is actively partnering with the CABY IRWMP Group. This partnership is an ongoing commitment with local and regional partners to focus on shared watershed issues and concerns, and has successfully attracted millions of dollars of grant funding to our region.

• Scotts Flat Lake Forestry Project: This project is to reduce fire risk by thinning the understory on forested lands. The project is funded by the Sierra Nevada Conservancy.

• Scotts Flat Lake Hazard Tree Removal: NID is removing trees impacted by drought and pine beetles. This will improve forest health and reduce fire risk.

• Recreation: Camping, fishing, hiking, swimming, sunning, boating, waterskiing, sailing, kayaking and other activities are popular at both Rollins and Scotts Flat reservoirs in the Sierra foothills. Day use parks, campgrounds and beaches are operated by the district (Greenhorn is operated by a private operator under contract with NID).

In the mountains, NID maintains and operates campgrounds and recreational facilities in the Jackson Meadows – Bowman Lake areas. Jackson Meadows features several campgrounds, picnic day use sites and boat ramps. Other campgrounds are located at Bowman, Canyon Creek, Sawmill and Faucherie Lakes in the Bowman corridor.

The primary recreation season in the high mountain areas generally runs from Memorial Day through Labor Day, depending on weather.

NID Customers Praised for Conservation Efforts as Drought Declaration Lifted

Contact:
Susan Holt
(530) 271-6735

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

NID Customers Praised for Conservation Efforts as Drought Declaration Lifted

Grass Valley – The Nevada Irrigation District applauds customers for their unprecedented water conservation efforts, as Governor Jerry Brown lifted the drought state of emergency declaration on April 7, 2017.

NID customers actively confronted California’s recent extreme drought, conserving an astonishing 26% overall since 2013.Treated water customers conserved approximately 2.3 billion gallons of water. Agriculture customers conserved around 10,000 acre feet (AF) of water, and NID operational modifications saved an additional 10,000 AF.

Statewide conservation and this winter season’s abundant rain and snow amounts prompted the Governor to end the drought state of emergency for the majority of California. Four counties remain under the emergency order to help address diminished Central Valley groundwater supplies.

In a written release, Brown stated that “the next drought could be around the corner,” and “conservation must be a way of life.” Water reporting requirements and prohibitions on wasteful water use practices remain in effect statewide, including restrictions on watering during, or directly following rainfall. NID supports state efforts to make conservation a way of life in California.

NID the Target of YubaNet’s “April Fools” Joke

Contact:
Susan Holt
(530) 271-6735

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

NID the Target of YubaNet’s “April Fools” Joke

Grass Valley – The Nevada Irrigation District was the subject of an “April Fools” article published on Saturday, April 1st by YubaNet titled, “NID ponders grand bargain on Centennial Dam.” It appears this “April Fools” joke run by YubaNet has made its way into our community. The article has triggered community confusion about our District’s principles and practices.

There are statements in the YubaNet article questioning NID’s integrity. The article alleges scandalous and illegal practices, including a fake “leaked memo,” accusing the Board of Directors and General Manager of bribery. Quotes in the article are entirely fabricated, including those attributed to the Board and the General Manager. The advocacy groups mentioned and their ascribed excerpts are also fictional.

NID would like to assure the public that this was an “April Fools” joke run solely by YubaNet. NID was not involved in any way in the creation or development of the article. The information contained in the article is fake, and in no way represents the District, or its practices. NID is committed to transparency.

While NID appreciates the attempt at humor, the District has received numerous public comments citing the article. Even a lighthearted “April Fools” joke can be confusing when taken literally, or out of context.

NID: Snowpack at 168% of Average

Contact:
Chip Close
(530) 273-6185
or: Susan Holt
(530) 271-6735

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

NID: Snowpack at 168% of Average

Grass Valley – In snow surveys taken Thursday (March 29), the Nevada Irrigation District measured 168 percent of average water content in the mountain snowpack that supplies the NID water system.

Although NID expects sufficient water supplies this year, the State Water Resources Control Board emergency drought regulations have not been lifted and statewide water use restrictions remain in effect. The District is hopeful that the encouraging snowpack totals will allow the state to lift the mandatory drought regulations. However, NID continues to promote conservation as a way of life. “The water conserved by NID customers stays in local reservoir storage for local use,” said NID Water Resources Supt. Sue Sindt.

In the March 29 snow survey, NID surveyors measured an average 56.1 inches of water content on five mountain snow courses. The March 1 five-course average is 33.3 inches.

“Even though March was slightly below average in precipitation, there was a slight gain in the snow water content, and the April 1 water content is well above the seasonal average,” explained Sindt. “Nearly all reservoirs are already full and with the amount of runoff expected from the snow, reservoirs should stay full into early summer.”

The snow survey recorded water content on mountain snow courses ranging in elevation from 5,650 feet to 7,800 feet. NID’s highest course, Webber Peak, at 7,800 feet, had 150.5 inches of snow with a water content of 72.5 inches. The English Mountain snow course (7,100 ft.) had 121.1 inches of snow with a water content of 67.9 inches.

Webber Lake (7,000 ft.) had 119.9 inches of snow with a water content of 56.9 inches. Findley Peak (6,500 ft.) had a snowpack of 105.3 inches and a 51.3-inch water content. Bowman Reservoir (elev. 5650 ft.) had 70.4 inches of snow with a 32.1-inch water content.

An additional snow survey on the Chalk Bluff snow course (4,850 ft.) on the Deer Creek watershed found 2.5 inches of snow with a water content of 1 inch. (The Chalk Bluff surveys are not included in the average.)

Seasonal precipitation at Bowman Reservoir had reached 118.11 inches by Mar. 29, which equals 204 percent of average for the date. (Seasonal precipitation is measured July 1-June 30.) March precipitation totaled 8.66 inches, which is 82 percent of average.

As of Mar. 29, NID reservoirs held 240,000 acre-feet of water, which is 90 percent of capacity and 132 percent of average for the date. Sindt confirmed that “there is plenty of water to meet all of our customer demands, and we should end the season with above average carry-over storage.”

A member of the California Cooperative Snow Survey, NID conducts four official snow surveys each year, in February, March, April and May.

NID: Reservoir Infrastructure Storm Damage Report

Contact:
Susan Holt
(530) 271-6735

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

NID: Reservoir Infrastructure Storm Damage Report

Maintaining public safety is paramount at NID. This year’s powerful winter storms with record precipitation, intense high flows, and flooding have triggered heightened awareness across California. NID is sensitive to community concerns over potential infrastructure damage due the intensity of this season’s storms in the Sierras.

Current minimal infrastructure damage poses no risk to community safety, and extensive efforts are underway to avoid any impact to water supply. NID is actively working with regulatory agencies to ensure public safety by combining the District’s expertise with specialists from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s (FERC’s) Division of Dam Safety and Inspection, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the California Department of Water Resources’ Division of Safety of Dams (DSOD), and the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services.
There is some cosmetic damage to the Rollins Reservoir spillway. The most visible damage to NID’s infrastructure is on the Scott’s Flat spillway. To ensure safety and quick repairs, NID has assigned a team of engineers to complete repairs of the damaged spillway. Regular visual inspections are taking place, and a comprehensive evaluation of the spillway will be completed when the winter flows recede.

The District has a robust dam safety program, which includes regular visual and physical monitoring of NID infrastructure. District surveyors monitor the dams for any movement, and staff regularly measure leakage weirs and take readings from piezometers buried in the dams. All of the monitoring information is consistently reviewed by a full time engineer with specialized expertise in dam related issues. The inspection program will alert staff of potential issues.

NID’s ongoing commitment to infrastructure safety involves participation in annual FERC and DSOD inspections. NID also retains an independent consultant to complete a safety evaluation of all FERC jurisdictional dams every five years. The current five-year evaluation is scheduled to be completed this summer.

NID works to maintain public safety and the uninterrupted delivery of a quality water supply by implementing exceptional reservoir safety programs. NID engineers will implement a repair plan to the Scotts Flat and Rollins spillways when access to the damage is feasible, and will continue to monitor infrastructure with specialists. Preliminary repairs are expected to be completed early this summer.

NID Board Approves Grant Agreement for Studies of Hemphill Diversion Facility

Contact:
Susan Holt
(530) 271-6735

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

NID Board Approves Grant Agreement for Studies of Hemphill Diversion Facility

Grass Valley – The Nevada Irrigation District Board Members on Wednesday (March 22) unanimously approved a grant agreement from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW), for studies related to the Hemphill Diversion modification or replacement.

The grant from CDFW outlines items to be evaluated, including the study of fish within the project area, and is part of an ongoing assessment and alternative development for the facility. The grant agreement will help NID further understand the site and identify responsible alternatives to the partial fish migration barrier.

NID is dedicated to providing exceptional stewardship of the resources in the District’s care. Diversion alternatives are being explored to increase habitat for native anadromous species.

Project objectives include development and oversight of a Technical Advisory Group, hydraulic analysis, a sediment transport study, baseline water quality data, and two seasons of adult Salmon, Steelhead, and Redd surveys, conducted above and below the diversion site in Auburn Ravine.

The District has issued a Request for Proposals for water quality and fish studies, due March 31, 2017. The Hemphill Diversion Project includes a $177k CDFW grant, along with $118k in funds provided by NID.

The complex Hemphill diversion project is expect to be completed in 2020. Friends of Auburn Ravine representative, Jim Haufler, expressed appreciation to the Board for the thoroughness of the work already completed, and for taking the time to consider the consequences, avoid mistakes, and get it done right.

In other business, Board Members:

• approved a mitigation monitoring and reporting program for the Newtown Reservoir Cleaning Project.
• approved further evaluation of NID’s potential involvement in the West Placer Groundwater Sustainability Agency.

The next regular meeting of the NID Board of Directors will be held at 9 a.m. on Wednesday, April 12, at the NID Business Center located at 1036 West Main Street, Grass Valley. NID Board meetings are open to the public.

NID Installs Interpretive Sign for Auburn Ravine

sign-5Contact:
Susan Holt
(530) 271-6735

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

NID Installs Interpretive Sign for Auburn Ravine

NID is pleased to provide an interpretive sign at the Auburn Ravine Creek in Lincoln. The sign, located near the District’s Lincoln Gauging Station in Auburn Ravine Park, was established by NID at the request of the public.

The sign includes information on the types of fish and habitat in the Auburn Ravine, and information about the fish ladder, walls, rocks, chutes, and pools NID installed to enhance the regional ecosystem.

NID completed a watershed improvement project to allow greater fish migration and bring a more natural condition to the site in 2011. The Auburn Ravine Fish Passage Project drew wide support from nearby residents, fishing and environmental advocates, city and county officials, and is part of NID’s ongoing support for restoration of the Auburn Ravine.

NID recognizes our local community partners who supported the interpretive sign, including the California Department of Water Resources, Granite Bay Flycasters, Placer County, and Dry Creek Conservancy.

Assistant General Manager Greg Jones acknowledged the value of the illustration for the local community. “We hope the new sign will inform and inspire residents and visitors to Auburn Ravine for years to come,” said Jones.

NID Appreciates Community Engagement

Contact:
Susan Holt
(530) 271-6735

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

NID Appreciates Community Engagement

The Nevada Irrigation District extends a sincere “Thank You” to those who attended the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) public scoping meetings, held earlier this month. The purpose of the meetings is to solicit public input for the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), which will be prepared by the Corps for the proposed Centennial Reservoir Project.

The first meeting took place on March 1st at the Holiday Inn Auburn Hotel, and was attended by an estimated 150 interested parties. Approximately 350 people participated in the second meeting, held on March 2nd at the Gold Miners Inn/Holiday Inn Express & Suites in Grass Valley. Representatives from the Corps Sacramento District Office provided an overview of the proposed project, and were available to answer questions and receive public comments.

Feedback from the community is an essential component of the process, and is necessary for a complete evaluation of the impacts of the proposed project. NID greatly appreciates the hundreds who took part in the public involvement program by participating in the scoping meetings. The District welcomes public input on the proposed project, and looks forward to future community engagement.

The Draft EIS is expected to be available for public review and comment by January 2018. More information on the proposed project is posted on NID’s website at www.centennialreservoir.com.
Comments may be submitted by email at CESPKCentennialReser@usace.army.mil, or by mail at 1325 J Street, Room 1350, Sacramento, CA 95814-2922. For more information, please contact Ms. Kara Hellige at 970-259-1604, or at CESPKCentennialReser@usace.army.mil.

NID Board Hears Report on District’s Financial Position and Forecast

Contact:
Susan Holt
(530) 271-6735

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

NID Board Hears Report on District’s Financial Position and Forecast

At the Wednesday (Mar. 8) NID Board of Director’s meeting, the Board was updated on the District’s financial position and fiscal forecast. Prudent oversight of financial activities assists with adherence to investment policies, and demonstrates NID’s exceptional management of District assets.

NID’s Finance Manager/Treasurer, Marvin Davis, reported overall cash reserves at $96.9 million, with $20.3 restricted for Series 2016A Bonds. The District will create a $500,000 capital reserve for recreation and a $1.5 million reserve for a Community Investment Program.

“NID is solid and financially strong,” explained Davis. The short-term cash forecast extending through December 2017 contains an estimated $11.8 million. The long-term maturity ladder currently includes $60.2 million with 65% held in 5 year investments, subject to financial variables.

Regular financial reports are essential to fulfilling the District’s commitment to fiscal transparency and excellence. To achieve this outstanding standard, NID’s finance department prepares monthly reports, including short-term cash forecasts, long-term capital spending, and a portfolio maturity ladder. Board policy requires actual versus budget updates and investment reports to be provided to the Board quarterly.

In other business, Board Members:

• heard a demonstration on Placer County’s implementation of the Sustainable Ground Water Management Act (SGMA) presented by Placer County Principal Management Analyst, Brett Storey.

• awarded a $108,805.50 contract to Open Systems International for the design and implementation of the Hydroelectric-wide Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Upgrade Project. The project will improve operational efficiencies in monitoring and control of District powerhouses.

• heard an update on a Sphere of Influence (SOI) expansion project meant to incorporate currently underserved areas within District boundaries.

• approved developing a plan to provide audio recordings of District Board meetings to be posted on NID’s website.
The next regular meeting of the NID Board of Directors will be held at 9 a.m. on Wednesday, March 22, at the NID Business Center located at 1036 West Main Street, Grass Valley. NID Board meetings are open to the public.

Switch to our desktop site